Books

This is the word cloud of the books I have read in 2019.

Here’s the list of the books.

  • Atomic habits by James Clear
  • My India by Jim Corbett 
  • Scale by Geoffrey West (A)
  • The happiness equation by Neil Parsricha
  • Think like Sherlock by Peter Hollins
  • Science of likability by Patrick king
  • Antifragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Alchemy of air by Thomas Hager
  • E=mc2 by David Bodanis
  • The secrets of happy families by Bruce Fieler
  • Wine by Rod Philips
  • The ghost map by Stephen Johnson
  • No one at the wheels by Sam Schwartz
  • Digital minimalism by Cal Newport
  • Farsighted by Stephen Johnson
  • Skin in the game by Nassim Nicolas Taleb
  • Gold by Mathew Hart
  • India conquered by Jon Wilson
  • When by Daniel H Pink
  • What Adam Smith can teach you Russ Robert
  • Science of food by Marty Jobson
  • The flight attendant by Chris Bohjalian (F)
  • Power of moments by Dan and Chip Heath
  • Spy school by Stuart Gibbs (F)
  • The memory code by L Kelly 
  • Fibre by Susan Crowford
  • An appetite for wonder by Richard Dawkins
  • How to have a good day by Caroline Web
  • The perfect bet by Adam Kucharski
  • The inmitibale Jeeves by P G Wood house (F)
  • The neuroscience of mindfulness by Stan Rodski
  • Humble pie by Matt Parker
  • The doomsday machine by Michale Lewis
  • Humans a brief history of how we f*cked it all up -Tom Philips
  • The Success Equation: Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing by Michael J. Mauboussin
  • The ape that understood the universe by Steve Stuart Williams (A)
  • The Little Book of String Theory by Steven Scott Gubser
  • Creating the Twentieth Century: Technical Innovations of 1867-1914 and Their Lasting Impact by Vaclav Smil
  • The passengers by John Marrs(F)
  • Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World by David Epstein
  • Our mathematical universe by Max tegmark
  • The big shot by Michale Louise
  • The one by John Marrs (F)
  • I contain multitudes by Ed Yong
  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson
  • The LEFT BRAIN SPEAKS The RIGHT BRAIN LAUGHS By Ransom Stephens
  • Logic of life by Tim Hartford
  • It all adds up by Mickale Launy
  • Birth of a Theorem: A Mathematical Adventure by Cédric Villani
  • Digital minimalism by Cal Newport
  • Cubed secret history of the office by Nikil Saval
  • Cities the first 6000 years by Monica L Smith 
  • Ultralearning by Scott young
  • Everyday biases by Ross Howard J
  • Rebel ideas by Matthew Syed(R)
  • Why we sleep by Matthew Walker
  • Pleased to meet me by Bill Sullivan 
  • The greatest show on earth by Richard Dawkins
  • Math on the back of the envelope by Rob Eastaway
  • Idiot brain by Dean Burnnet
  • Pig wrestling by Pete Lindsay
  • Replay by Kin Grimwood (F) 
  • Elon musk by B Storm
  • Meet your happy chemicals by Loretta Buenning
  • Genesis by Robin Cook (F)
  • Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life by Nir Eyal

My top favorites

  • Why we sleep by Matthew Walker
  • Replay by Kin Grimwood
  • Rebel ideas by Matthew Syed
  • The ape that understood the universe by Steve Stuart Williams
  • India conquered by Jon Wilson
  • The ghost map by Stephen Johnson
  • Skin in the game by Nassim Nicolas Taleb
  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

Kids painting

This year started with no internet at our house.

On the evening of 27th December, a day after Boxing Day, the Internet of the home suddenly went down and it remained down till 2nd January.

This is the first time after so many years that the family as a whole has experienced such forced internet break.

For the first time 10 hours, as a family we had looked at the internet router more than in the last 5 years combined.

For the first time everyone had more time than we ever realized. So we started painting, rediscovered board games and kids completed thrice the number of books that they did with internet on.

Painting by kids.

Hope to curve out few days like this again?

Happy New Year

Last year was funny, I posted my 500th post on this blog and that happened to be the second post of year and then a long hibernation.

I will not go into the reasons for this complete disregard of this activity except that I was lazy.

This year I intend to be more regular and consistent . Thanks to all who has stuck around.

Wish you all a very happy new year. Have a great 2020!

Quotes

Few quotes that have recently made me pace and reflect.

The best way to change long-term behavior is with short-term feedback.

— Seth Godin

The central information about people: what is the worse thing they’ve done in their lives.

— Nassim Nicholas Taleb

When you risk what you need to gain something you don’t need, it is foolish. It is just plain foolish.

— Warren Buffett

The hardest thing to learn in life is which bridge to cross and which to burn.

— Bertrand Russell

Too much good food is worse than too little bad food.

— Hebrew proverb

Prepare the child for the road, not the road for the child.

— Folk Wisdom

The best books aren’t those that teach you facts, but those that subtly change your entire thinking patterns

— Anon

Books Read in 2018

I completely agree with Paul Graham when he said “Reading and experience train your model of the world. And even if you forget the experience or what you read, its effect on your model of the world persists. Your mind is like a compiled program you’ve lost the source of. It works, but you don’t know why”

2018 was a good year for reading; I traveled a bit that year, so there is lot of non-fiction, some old some new in the list for this year.

 

  • Think twice by Michael Mauboussin

Train your model of the world

Recently read this quote in one random blogpost that I stumbled upon surfing. Sorry forgot to save the link.

Loved it. As most of my work time, now a day are saturated with the words like, model, training etc., so this quote stuck a nerve.

Reading and experience train your model of the world. And even if you forget the experience or what you read, its effect on your model of the world persists. Your mind is like a compiled program you’ve lost the source of. It works, but you don’t know why. – Paul Graham

Thank you Guido

Here is a blog post that I am reposting from this link.

I have similar sentiments about python. I first began python in 2010 but truly took it up in summer of 2011 when a task to use Perl script landed as one of my assignment. Instead of Perl script, I worked with python and I have never looked back.

Therefore, without much delay here is the blogpost.

When I was in my early 20s, I was OK at programming, but I definitely didn’t like it. Then, one evening, I read the Python tutorial. That evening changed my mind. I woke up the next morning, like Neo in the matrix, and knew Python.

I was doing statistics at the time. Python, with Numeric, was a powerful tool. It definitely could do things that SPSS could only dream about. Suddenly, something has happened that never happened before — I started to enjoy programming.

I had to spend six years in the desert of programming in languages that were not Python, before my work place, and soon afterwards the world, realized what an amazing tool Python is. I have not had to struggle to find a Python position since.

I started with Python 1.4. I have grew up with Python. Now I am…no longer in my 20s, and Python version 3.7 was recently released.

I owe much of my career, many of my friends, and much of my hobby time to that one evening, sitting down and reading the Python tutorial — and to the man who made the language and wrote the first version of that tutorial, Guido van Rossum.

Python, like all open source projects, like, indeed, all software projects, is not a one man show. A whole team, with changing personnel, works on core Python and its ecosystem. But it was all started by Guido.

As Guido is stepping down to take a less active role in Python’s future, I want to offer my eternal gratitude. For my amazing career, for my friends, for my hobby. Thank you, Guido van Rossum. Your contribution to humanity, and to this one human in particular, is hard to overestimate.