Quotes- Three ways to add value

If I have to lose all the blogs that I follow, read, and just choose one, it will be Seth Godin’s blog.

It’s concise and the most consistent outside thing in my life.  I admire the consistency of the posts.

Here are few quotes or highlighted texts collected over last year.

  • The key question to ask in the meeting is: Are we increasing value or lowering costs? -SG
  • Technology destroys the perfect and then it enables the impossible –SG
  • A small thing, repeated, is not a small thing. –SG
  • Science is not something to believe or not believe. It is something to do. –SG
  • Nurturing and investing in the things we need and count on needs to be higher on the agenda. –SG
  • One clue that someone does not understand a problem is that they need a large number of variables and factors to explain it. –SG
  • Everyone has feelings and opinions, but the future ignores them. -SG
  • Bad decisions happen for one of two reasons: A. you’re in a huge hurry and you can’t process all the incoming properly. But more common… B. The repercussions of your decision won’t happen for months or years. -SG
  • The goal isn’t to clear the table, the goal is to set the table. –SG
  • 3 ways to add value: Tasks, decisions, and initiation… Doing, choosing, and starting… Each of the three adds value, but one is more prized than the others. -SG
  • We always have a choice, but often, it’s a good idea to act as if we don’t. -SG
  • Writing a sentence is easy. Deciding what to write in the next sentence is hard. -SG
  • The local requires less commitment, feels less risky, doesn’t demand a point of view. The express, on the other hand, always looks like a better idea after you’ve embraced it and gotten to where you meant to go. Express or local? -SG
  • There are people who can cut corners better than you, work more hours than you and certainly work cheaper than you. But what would happen if you became the person who was smarter, better at solving problems and cared the most? -SG
  • The simplest antidote to a tough day is generosity. Waves are free, and smiles are an irresistible bonus. -SG
  • New days require new decisions. –SG
  • The thing about responsibility is that it’s most effectively taken, not given. –SG
  • …When in doubt, do the generous thing. It usually works out the best. -SG
  • When leading a team, it’s tempting to slow things down for the people near the back of the pack. It doesn’t matter, though. They’ll just slow down more. They like it back there. In fact, if your goal is to get the tribe somewhere, it pays to speed up, not slow down. They’ll catch up -SG
  • We notice what we care about and work hard to ignore the rest. You can change what you care about by changing what you notice –SG
  • If you’re the kind of person that needs a crisis to move forward, feel free to invent one. Take the good ideas that aren’t going anywhere and delete them, give them away, hand them off to your team. -SG
  • When we can see these glitches as clowns, as temporary glitches that are unrelated to the cosmic harmony of the universe or even the next thing that’s going to happen to us, they’re easier to compartmentalize. -SG
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Feap installation with visual studio

If you ever require a FEM system for quick fem for educational or research purpose. Feap is one of the easiest to get started with.

Here’s a rundown with screenshots on how to build it with visual studio with Intel Fortran.

Hope this helps.

Step 0:

Download from:

http://projects.ce.berkeley.edu/feap/feappv/feappv41.zip

Project Page:

http://projects.ce.berkeley.edu/feap/feappv/

Two steps

  1. Build a library
  2. Build the program
  1. Select New Project

  1. Select New Project
    1. Select Library: Select Static Library
    2. Name library e.g. lib22

  1. Under the Projects tab select Add Existing Item
    1. Add all subroutines in directories: Elements, Plot, Program, User, and Windows (do not include Unix, Include, or Main).

Under the Projects tab select Properties

Select Fortran then General

b.) Set additional include path to point to the feappv include

directory (e.g. c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include) and the appropriate

    directory for 32-bit or 64-bit pointers (e.g.

    c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include\integer4 or

    c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include\integer8)

Build library

Building the Main program

Open Visual Studio or if open new project

a.) Select QuickWin Application, select QuickWin option

(not standard graphics QuickWin)

b.) Name main program e.g. feappv

At top select Release build (as opposed to Debug)

3. Under the Projects tab select Add Existing Item

a.) Set show all files in window and add library (e.g. lib22)

Visual Studio normally places this in

c:\users\xxx\documents\visual studio\projects\lib22\lib22\release

b.) Add feappv.f from the subdirectory Main.

4. Under the Projects tab select Properties

a.) Select Fortran then General

b.) Set additional include path to point to the feappv include

directory (e.g. c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include) and the appropriate

    directory for 32-bit or 64-bit pointers (e.g.

    c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include\integer4 or

    c:\users\xxx\feappv\ver22\include\integer8)

Add the libraries and the library path

Build… If you get error like this, you have not included all forttan file sin the liberay include and come pback..



Panda Time index vs DateTime and Inconveniences

Sometimes convenience becomes a handicap. Saw this first hand later last month.

Was so used to using Pandas DataFrame and the Timeindex object that when I had to move back to a system which didn’t have pandas I was struggling to get a simplified day of year, day of week and week of year from python’s standard datetime module.

Here is how all this available in Pandas from a Timeindex column or index.

If your looks like this, with index as time

You can get all the convenience functions like this

However, this gave an opportunity to explore datetime and here is the code to get all this and more from date time.

import datetime
today=datetime.datetime.today()
day_of_year = today.timetuple().tm_yday
weekofyear=today.isocalendar()[1]
dayofweek=today.isocalendar()[2]

Inconveniences are good; they always end up teaching you something.

5 Book Recommendations for the summer.

From the books, I have read so far, here are the five I think should be worth a read.

From how your vegetarian friend is changing the world, to getting to know Mendel. From X chromosomes to placing bets, the recommended books have lot to offer.

All of them are enjoyable read. Books should be able to take you to a different place and time and these books all deliver on that.

  1. The X in Sex: How the X Chromosome Controls Our Lives by David Bainbridge
  2. Adopt by Tim Hartford
  3. The Gene An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  4. Skin in the Game – The Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life by Nassim Taleb
  5. Thinking in Bets – Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts by Annie Duke

All links point to good reads, if you want to know more.

What is “uncertainty quantification”?

Quantifying Uncertainty in Subsurface Systems, a new book just published by the American Geophysical Union, explores what we know and don’t know about the extent underground resources, and how we can make decisions in the face of uncertainty.
 
Although the book explores how uncertainty quantification can enable optimal decisions in the exploration, appraisal, and development of subsurface resources, it covers many data scientific methods that allow representing geological variability with simple statistical tools.
 
This article include few of the questions one of the editor of this book covers, one that is particular covered in this blog on uncertainty quantification is listed below.
 
 
 
What is “uncertainty quantification”?
 
In the broadest sense, it is a measure of our lack of understanding. This is difficult: it is easier to list what we know than what we don’t know. The quantification part points to a scientific approach to the problem that involves axioms, definitions and rules. Uncertainty quantification is both prescriptive and normative: a set of rules on how to proceed are created based on mathematics and logic, in particular, probability theory and statistics. Within those rules, calculations are done that involve observed data as well as global understanding of the subsurface system created from experience. Thus, it allows making optimal decisions even if we cannot perfectly predict the outcome of the actions we take in the exploration, appraisal and development of subsurface resources.
 
See the table of contents of the book here